New NASA Data Blow Gaping Hole In Global Warming Alarmism


NASA satellite data from the years 2000 through 2011 show the Earth’s atmosphere is allowing far more heat to be released into space than alarmist computer models have predicted, reports a new study in the peer-reviewed science journal Remote Sensing. The study indicates far less future global warming will occur than United Nations computer models have predicted, and supports prior studies indicating increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide trap far less heat than alarmists have claimed.
Study co-author Dr. Roy Spencer, a principal research scientist at the University of Alabama in Huntsville and U.S. Science Team Leader for the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer flying on NASA’s Aqua satellite, reports that real-world data from NASA’s Terra satellite contradict multiple assumptions fed into alarmist computer models.
“The satellite observations suggest there is much more energy lost to space during and after warming than the climate models show,” Spencer said in a July 26 University of Alabama press release. “There is a huge discrepancy between the data and the forecasts that is especially big over the oceans.”
In addition to finding that far less heat is being trapped than alarmist computer models have predicted, the NASA satellite data show the atmosphere begins shedding heat into space long before United Nations computer models predicted.
The new findings are extremely important and should dramatically alter the global warming debate.
Scientists on all sides of the global warming debate are in general agreement about how much heat is being directly trapped by human emissions of carbon dioxide (the answer is “not much”). However, the single most important issue in the global warming debate is whether carbon dioxide emissions will indirectly trap far more heat by causing large increases in atmospheric humidity and cirrus clouds. Alarmist computer models assume human carbon dioxide emissions indirectly cause substantial increases in atmospheric humidity and cirrus clouds (each of which are very effective at trapping heat), but real-world data have long shown that carbon dioxide emissions are not causing as much atmospheric humidity and cirrus clouds as the alarmist computer models have predicted.
The new NASA Terra satellite data are consistent with long-term NOAA and NASA data indicating atmospheric humidity and cirrus clouds are not increasing in the manner predicted by alarmist computer models. The Terra satellite data also support data collected by NASA’s ERBS satellite showing far more longwave radiation (and thus, heat) escaped into space between 1985 and 1999 than alarmist computer models had predicted. Together, the NASA ERBS and Terra satellite data show that for 25 years and counting, carbon dioxide emissions have directly and indirectly trapped far less heat than alarmist computer models have predicted.
In short, the central premise of alarmist global warming theory is that carbon dioxide emissions should be directly and indirectly trapping a certain amount of heat in the earth’s atmosphere and preventing it from escaping into space. Real-world measurements, however, show far less heat is being trapped in the earth’s atmosphere than the alarmist computer models predict, and far more heat is escaping into space than the alarmist computer models predict.
When objective NASA satellite data, reported in a peer-reviewed scientific journal, show a “huge discrepancy” between alarmist climate models and real-world facts, climate scientists, the media and our elected officials would be wise to take notice. Whether or not they do so will tell us a great deal about how honest the purveyors of global warming alarmism truly are.
James M. Taylor is senior fellow for environment policy at The Heartland Institute and managing editor of Environment & Climate News.

Can the Earth’s Wandering Magnetic Poles Cause Deadly Superstorms?


The Earth’s magnetic poles have started moving at an increased rate in recent years. Some fear a catastrophic pole flip. Most scientists don’t seem worried. 

(FOX News)- Will the wandering magnetic North Pole create crazy superstorms?
The eye-popping connection between the planet’s weather and itsmagnetic field has caught hold among scaremongers recently, ever since scientists described the potential of devastating “superstorms” — storms caused, scientists say, by flowing gushers of water in the sky known as atmospheric rivers. Some worriers say that these tubocharged tsunamis will soon be widespread, thanks to the increased movement of the Earth’s magnetic field. 
And that when the field shifts, the story goes, anything can happen. All hell will break loose, they say, arguing that the shift has a greater effect on the world’s weather than even the carbon-based influences scientists have been carefully monitoring.
Poppycock, say the best scientific minds in the Northern Hemisphere.
“Trying to link all of these things together is kind of preposterous,” said Dr. Carol Raymond, principal scientist and a geophysicist with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab, which operates a fleet of satellites that closely monitor the planet and leads the charge in Earth Science research. Read more here.

5.3 billion mobile subscriptions


There will be 5.3 billion mobile subscriptions by the end of 2010, estimates The International Telecommunication Union (October 2010). That is equivalent to 77 percent of the world population. And is a huge increase from 4.6 billion mobile subscriptions at the end of 2009.
• 90 percent of the world now lives in a place with access to a mobile network. For people living in rural communities this is lower at 80 percent.
• At the end of 2010 there could be 3.8 billion mobile subscriptions in the developing world – that’s 73 percent of global subscriptions.
• For more on the latest ITU stats read this: interview with ITU statistics chief Susan Teltscher

Key Global Telecom Indicators for the World Telecommunication Service Sector in 2010
(all figures are estimates)
  Global Developed
nations
Developing
nations
Africa Arab
States
Asia & Pacific CIS Europe The Americas
Mobile cellular subscriptions
(millions)
5,282 1,436 3,846 333 282 2,649 364 741 880
Per 100 people 76.2% 116.1% 67.6% 41.4% 79.4% 67.8% 131.5% 120.0% 94.1%
Fixed telephone lines
(millions) 
(
1,197 506 691 13 33 549 74 249 262
Per 100 people 17.3% 40.9% 12.1% 1.6% 9.4% 14.0% 26.6% 40.3% 28.1%
Mobile broadband subscriptions
(millions)
940 631 309 29 34 278 72 286 226
Per 100 people 13.6% 51.1% 5.4% 3.6% 9.7% 7.1% 25.9% 46.3% 24.2%
Fixed broadband subscriptions
(millions)
555 304 251 1 8 223 24 148 145
per 100 people 8.0% 24.6% 4.4% 0.2% 2.3% 5.7% 8.7% 23.9% 15.5%
Source: International Telecommunication Union (October 2010)   via: mobiThinking

World’s first ice touchscreen virtually burns


World’s first ice touchscreen virtually burns – tech

IT BRINGS a whole new meaning to freeze frame. A team at Nokia in Finland has created one of the unlikeliest computer displays yet – the world’s first ice touchscreen.

It is not a practical device, of course, but the screen is being seen as a step towards an era in which the surfaces around us gain computing capabilities (see “What is ubiqitous computing?”).

“This was a playful experiment, but one that we think showed interactive computing interfaces can now be built anywhere,” says Jyri Huopaniemi at Nokia’s research lab in Tampere, whose team built the touchscreen, dubbed Ubice, or ubiquitous ice.

Finland has a tradition of building snow and ice sculptures during its long winter. It was these that inspired the device, says Antti Virolainen, a member of the Nokia team. “We decided to see if we could make an ice sculpture that was interactive.”

The team commissioned a firm in nearby Oulu to retrieve a tonne of 25-centimetre-thick river ice, and used a chainsaw to cut it into 50-centimetre-square slabs. They used these to make a 2-metre by 1.5-metre ice wall and then blasted the surface with a heat gun – more typically used for stripping paint – to create a smooth surface.

The team made their wall an interactive one by using digital projection technology, rather than peppering the ice with sensors that would raise the cost of the installation, Virolainen told the Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces conference in Saarbrücken, Germany, last week. The icescreen uses rear-diffused illumination (RDI), a technique first used by Microsoft in its table-based interactive touchscreen, Surface, launched in 2008.

A near-infrared light source mounted behind the “screen” bathes it in invisible light, and an array of near-infrared cameras, also behind the wall, are focused on the front surface. A hand placed on the ice reflects the light towards the camera array and the signal each camera receives helps a nearby PC establish the hand’s position, size and motion. The PC is also connected to a projector, which uses the data to project imagery – such as flames – beneath the user’s hand.

“It was -15 °C out there so it was very interesting to show ice on fire,” says Virolainen. “It wouldn’t have been anywhere near as interesting with a plastic screen.”

Patrick Baudisch of the University of Potsdam in Germany, who has turned toy building blocksMovie Camera and floorsMovie Camera into interactive devices, says the touchscreen could be compared to Microsoft Surface, with flaws in the ice limiting the accuracy with which it can locate a user’s hand. “But that would miss the point. This is a wonderful piece of work and a quirky idea.”

Nokia suggests ice sculptors, or owners of ice buildings like the Ice Hotel in Jukkasjärvi, Sweden, could make a feature of the technology.

“Playful experiments like this are important – people really liked it,” says Huopaniemi. “New forms of interaction, sensing and content delivery for future mobile devices could come out of it.”

http://c.brightcove.com/services/viewer/federated_f9?isVid=1

iPhone app reveals the emotional downside of daydreams – life – 11 November 2010 – New Scientist


iPhone app reveals the emotional downside of daydreams

Daydreaming seems to be bad for your mental health, say the psychologists who used an iPhone app to track the moods of more than 2000 people.

The app let the researchers do something that traditional psychology methods do not: intrude on people’s lives on a regular basis. Around three times a day, the software prompts users to answer questions about what they are doing and feeling. It also asks users to say whether they are focusing on whatever task is at hand, or if their mind is wandering.

Mind-wandering turns out to be extremely common – users reported daydreaming almost 50 per cent of the time. The state occurred most frequently while people were brushing their teeth or doing other grooming. During only one activity – making love – did the frequency of mind-wandering drop below 30 per cent.

App users were also more likely to report feeling unhappy when their mind was wandering. Crucially, episodes of mind-wandering tended to precede bouts of low mood, but not vice versa, suggesting that the former caused the latter.

“That’s the biggest take-home,” says Matthew Killingsworth of Harvard University, who conducted the study with his colleague Daniel Gilbert. “Mind-wandering might be something that is damaging to people’s happiness.”

Sad bias

The link may be due to an asymmetry in how daydreams affect mood. Killingsworth and Gilbert found that daydreams about pleasant things were linked to improvements in mood, but only slight improvements. Thinking about neutral topics while mind-wandering was linked to a similarly modest drop in happiness, but daydreams about unpleasant topics coincided with a 20-point drop on the 100-point scale that app users used to rate their mood.

“This is a really solid piece of work,” says Jonathan Smallwood at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He says that mind-wandering and levels of happiness have been linked in laboratory studies, but never before in such a large population of people going about their daily lives.

But the claim that mind-wandering causes unhappiness needs to be further evaluated, he adds, because he and others have shown the effect can run in the opposite direction. In laboratory experiments, he found that lowering a person’s mood, perhaps by showing them a video about a sad story, led to more mind-wandering.

“It’s difficult to make causal claims,” says Smallwood. “But it’s undoubtedly the case that negative mood and mind-wandering are inextricably linked.”

The connection suggests that cutting down on mind-wandering, either by practising meditation or simply by keeping busy, could help people battle depression. Cutting out daydreaming altogether, even if that were possible, is not recommended, though: “The irony is that mind-wandering also underlies invention,” says Smallwood. “We don’t want to tell people not to do it.”